Common Guest Gripes and How To Deal With Them

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Weddings, on the surface anyway, are 90% about the bride and 10% about the groom. Although this is your big day, the experience your guests have is going to be a big part of the overall experience. It’s pretty common for the happy couple to forget about their guests and let their experience suffer. Here are some of the most common complaints from wedding guests, and how you can deal with them.

That Date Doesn’t Really Work For Me

It’s essential that you choose a date for the big day carefully, as this is one of the most common gripes you hear from wedding guests. Think carefully before asking any of your guests to sacrifice their kid’s graduation ceremony or even the Super Bowl to celebrate your union. As you probably know, finding a date that works for you and your partner in the first place is going to be tough. If it looks like you’re going to have to arrange it for a potentially tricky time of the year, call up your closest loved ones and see if they’ve already got plans around that time. Some things, like labor day, are going to be easier to pull off than others. Start by figuring out your own limitations, and send out those invitations as soon as possible.

How Much?!

One of the universal truths about weddings is that guests absolutely loathe cash bars. If it’s possible, you should be avoiding cash bars like the plague! You’d never charge a guest in your home for a drink, and your wedding shouldn’t be any different. It would be easy enough for anyone you’re inviting to look up articles like this: A Budget-Proof Savings Guide for Wedding Guests. Still, you should be going out of your way to make sure your guests really feel like guests. If you can’t afford an open bar with the current budget, think of a few things that you could cut down on in order to free up some money. Yes, a live band would be awesome, but is it worth making your guests reach for their wallet every time they want a drink? If you really can’t afford an open bar, then set a cash bar with a limited selection of drinks; beer, wine, champagne and a few specialty cocktails.

The Food Wasn’t Great…

After all the frills and main features are organized, the food you’re serving at the reception can easily fall to the bottom of the list. However, no amount of décor will be able to distract your guests from chicken that tastes like rubber and microscopic shrimp. Be sure to ask everyone about dietary requirements and allergies ahead of time, and carve off a fairly big chunk of your budget for the food you’ll be serving. It’s also very important to make sure there’s enough food to go around during cocktail hour. If you’re only going to be having some light nibbles and desserts, that’s fine, just make sure you’re mentioning it to your guests so they know to fill up!

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